Canadian House Divided

Angus Reid Institute just publish a report they called “Fractured Federation” with some interesting findings.

In this poll they asked people from all Canadian provinces about their views regarding other parts of Canada.

MapleDude.Ca will give a short recap of its key points.

Canadian House Divided / Image, Picture, Drawing / MapleDude.Ca
Original image by MapleDude.Ca

The Institute found that Atlantic provinces have issues with Quebec and Ontario, Quebec has issues with everybody and British Columbia feels isolated.

3 out of 10 people in BC said that they have a close relationships with Alberta, but 43% in BC don’t think that they have any friends at all.

People in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba feel a kinship with each other, but 40% of the population there don’t think they treated warmly by Ontario. 75% say the same of Quebec, this demonstrates a problematic disconnect.

People in Quebec feel almost no connection to any Canadian provinces, the best connection is with Ontario, but only 12% of the Quebec population said that they have it. Attitude towards other Canadian provinces in Quebec is very cold. Although 42% of Ontarians have a positive and friendly attitude towards Quebec.

People in Ontario and Quebec have unfriendly attitude towards other provinces while other smaller Canadian provinces don’t show that at all. In Ontario 25 – 42% of the people have a bad views of the other provinces, and in Quebec this is 41 – 81%.

All Atlantic Canadian provinces (New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island) show a strong connection with each other, also they feel a good connection to Alberta.

Some interesting opinions were found in Quebec among men (67%), who feel hostility from Alberta. This number is much lower (36%) among women of Quebec.

People in all Canadian provinces were asked an important question: are there provinces or regions (perhaps including your own) that give more than they get being part of Canada?

Here is how people answered:

  • Alberta – 32%;
  • Saskatchewan – 16%;
  • Atlantic Canada – 16%;
  • Ontario – 16%;
  • British Columbia – 10%;
  • Quebec – 9%;
  • Manitoba – 9%.

What Are The Main Imports And Exports Of Canada?

Canada is very active when it comes to trade, its total export was $390 billion in 2016 and total import $416 billion (According to WTO). The main Canadian trade partners are The United States, European Union, China, Japan and Mexico.

The United States is the most important Canadian trade partner, Canada buys 75%+ of all goods from the U.S. and sell 52% of Canadian products and services to its southern big brother.

The question today is: what exactly are the main imports and exports of Canada? To put it simply: what Canada produces and what it buys from other countries? Let’s figure this out.

Today such data is quite easy to find, all trade statistics is published by many organizations, but probably the best source is the atlas.media.mit.edu. This is a project of Massachusetts Institute of Technology with open and transparent data.

What Are The Main Imports And Exports Of Canada / Infographic / MapleDude.Ca
Infographic by MapleDude.Ca

Canadian top imports are:

  • Cars ($26.4B);
  • Vehicle Parts ($20.4B);
  • Delivery Trucks ($12.9B);
  • Refined Petroleum ($10.8B);
  • Crude Petroleum ($10.3B).

Those are products Canada buys the most, the majority of them comes from The United States.

The biggest import categories are:

Machines (99B), Transportation (76.3B), Chemical Products (34.4B), Mineral Products (28B) and Metals (24.3B).

Canadian imports are quite diversified.

Canadian top exports:

  • Cars ($48.9B);
  • Crude Petroleum ($39.6B);
  • Vehicle Parts ($10.5B);
  • Refined Petroleum ($8.34B);
  • Sawn Wood ($7.79B).

This is what Canada produces and sells abroad. For Canada export of its natural resources (wood, oil) remains very important.

Main Canadian export categories are:

Mineral Products (70B), Transportation (75.9B), Machines (41.1B), Metals (28.3B) and Chemical Products (27.2B).

Canada, The United States and Mexico had a North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) which made trade between those countries easier. In 2018 it was replaced by Canada–United States–Mexico Agreement (CUSMA) by Donald Trump’s administration.

Is It Safe In Canada?

What are your chances of being robbed on dark Canadian snowy streets? What are major life ricks in Canada? To address the safety issue let’s take a look at some numbers and statistics.

Is It Safe In Canada / Image, picture, drawing, art / MapleDude.Ca
Original image by MapleDude.Ca

Canada is on 158th place in the world by murder rates (UNODC statistics) with 1.6 murders per 100,000 inhabitants (611 cases in 2016). A big brother just across the border, The U.S., has 5.35 murders per 100,000 citizens (17,250 cases in 2016). Compared to some South American countries (El Salvador, Honduras, Venezuela with 55+ murders per 100k people) Canada is super safe. Most of the western Europe and Asia (South Korea, Japan) is safer when it comes to killings and assaults, but Canada almost the best place in North and South America in terms of the violent crime.

Traffic-related death is another big cause of death in many countries, these numbers are calculated by WHO (World Health Organization).

By road fatalities per 100,000 inhabitants per year Canadians are standing well with just 6 (10.9 in the United States). Western Europe is a bit better, but Canadian roads can be called safe.

Many major causes of death are health related (stroke, heart disease, infections, etc.). Canadian healthcare has its problems, but it is one of the best in the world (because all countries have problems with their healthcare too). Canada takes 12-th place in the world by life expectancy with both sexes life expectancy equal to 82.2 years old.

There are very few countries with better life expectancy (Switzerland, Sweden, Iceland, Spain, Italy and few others). Every new Canadian immigrant has to go thru detailed medical exam and in case of a major health issue like an infection he or she can’t enter the country.

Robbery rate by country is not easy to find, according to United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime in 2015 Canada rate was equal to 61 per 100,000 people. This is not the best number, it is even higher than Lebanon, Russia, Senegal, Thailand and Kenya. Although we can assume that in many countries robbery is just not often reported due to many reasons; maybe there are no chances to catch a criminal, maybe it is reported often in Canada because people have insurance, so they can get a compensation, or maybe Canadian police is just very transparent as other Canadian government organizations, so they don’t hide numbers and publish everything as it is. In any case robbery seems to be a problem in Canada, but as in The United States chances of being robbed depend on the city and neighborhood.

There is no perfect country in the world.

Despite some local issues overall Canada is a quite safe country, numbers show that Canada is safer than The United States, not to mention troubling South American countries.

How Much It Costs To Buy A House In Canada?

If you want to buy a house in Canada for yourself or as an investment, you will find this article useful. Today MapleDude.Ca going to cover prices for houses in major Canadian cities and provinces.

How Much It Costs To Buy A House In Canada? / Image, table, drawing, picture / MapleDude.Ca
Original image by MapleDude.Ca

A good place to check housing market statistics is The Canadian Real Estate Association. According to this organization average house prices as of April 2018 were the highest in Vancouver city (British Columbia) – $1,092,000 with annual growth of 14.3%. Cost of a house in Toronto was $766,000 on average with -5.1% of annual decline.

Canadian Average price of a house in 2018 was around $495,000 with -11.3% decline which might suggest that the market is overheated.

Let’s have a look at more data from other Canadian cities and provinces, here is the average house prices by city:

Canadian Cities Average House Prices April 2018 / Image, table, drawing, picture / MapleDude.Ca
Canadian Cities Average House Prices April 2018

Note that any “average” numbers are not always representative, there are cheap and expensive houses in all places. The average value gives only a general picture.

And here are the average house prices by provinces:

Canadian Provinces Average House Prices April 2018 / Image, table, drawing, picture / MapleDude.Ca
Canadian Provinces Average House Prices April 2018