Proudly Canadian – No Name

“No Name” is a Canadian food brand under Loblaw umbrella. It is well known in Canada, and it is one of those things which can be found only in Canadian stores (No Frills, Real Canadian Superstore, Your Independent Grocer, Super-Valu, Maxi, Atlantic Superstore, Shoppers Drug Mart and others). Proudly Canadian “No Name” became an internet meme because of its simplistic design and affordable low price.

Proudly Canadian - No Name / Image, Drawing, Picture / MapleDude.Ca
´╗┐Original image by MapleDude.Ca´╗┐

Those are products that get straight to the point as BuzzFeed called them. For example there is a No Name wine, which doesn’t even says “wine” on its bottle, just “White Blank”. They have an “apple beverage”, which doesn’t try to pretend it is a high quality juice. They are not trying to increase brand value by writing lies on a package as other companies do, their only selling point is the price.

All Canadian products required by law to write everything in two official Canadian languages (English and French), but because of No Name’s minimalist design, it is also a thing. You can learn basic french in Canadian provinces with less than 5% of French speaking population by walking around stores and checking big No Name labels.

The brand was launched on March 21, 1978 by Loblaw company with 16 generic products. This company has a very strong positions on Canadian retail market and they cover all groups of buyers, from rich and middle class to less financially fortunate individuals. To compete with Walmart’s cheap goods Lablaw developed a strategy which concentrates only on low prices. They don’t invest in branding and packaging much, it is all the same for all products with yellow label.

Their website has a fun design too.

Of course No Name’s products have not the best quality, but food is food. Many people who want to save on their groceries need simple things like bread, milk and other stuff, there are many people who don’t want to overpay for fancy products and No Name fits their needs. Whet it comes to products which are very hard to fake, for example beans or peanuts, even middle class sometimes choose this brand.

The font they use called “Helvetica”, it was created by a Swiss designer (Helvetia is an old Latin name of Switzerland when it was a Roman province). This is not very popular font, but No Name uses it anyway.

also they never use capital letters…

Now they have more than 2900 different products and famous not only in Canada, but in the U.S. and other countries.

Proudly Canadian – Harvey’s

Canadian cuisine has many streams with First Nations, English, Scottish and French roots, but one kind is close to The United States and their modern burgers. Harvey’s is a Canadian fast food restaurant chain famous for its great meat.

It is very hard to compete with huge multinational corporations such as McDonald’s and Burger King, but Harvey’s does it well. They rely on local branding and high quality products.

Proudly Canadian - Harvey's / Image, Picture, Drawing / MapleDude.Ca
Original image by MapleDude.Ca

Just like Canada Goose this company is also 100% Canadian, for over 50 years their restaurants are own by Canadians and serving in all Canadian provinces.

At Harvey’s you’d get a great 600 Fahrenheit degrees grilled meat and you can choose its fresh topping like in Subway.

Company invested a lot in furniture in their restaurants so it feels like a Canadian place, something between a fancy pub and a sport bar, but without crazy drunks.

Harvey’s experience is nice for people who are looking for a bit more in a burger’s place, for a reasonable price you’d get a nice restaurant experience with private seats. Prices are ok, you can get a combo for $10, it is a bit higher than in other places, but when you try their burgers (original recipe from 1959) a big chance that you’d realize it’s totally worth it.

For those who watched American TV series “Suits” (which was shot in Toronto) and remember a cool guy named Harvey there, it feels like if Harvey was a Canadian, he’d definitely eat at Harvey’s.

MapleDude.Ca recommends you to try their food at least ones when you visit Canada, and for those who are Canadians, but never went there – you are missing out. Check out this Harvey’s review from KBDProductionsTV:

Harvey’s 2 Can Dine for $11.99 Challenge and Review – 2600 CALORIES

 

 

Kraft Mac & Cheese And Canadians

Canadian Mac and Cheese / Image, Drawing, Picture / MapleDude.Ca
Looks yummy? If so – you are probably a Canadian

A fun fact about Kraft Mac & Cheese (Macaroni and Cheese), a fast food popular in United States and Canada. Canadians consume a crazy amount of this food. According to Book by Kitty Shea – Teens in Canada (2008), Canadians buy 1.7 million boxes of Kraft Mac & Cheese every week and total world sales are 7 million boxes.

Canadians purchase about 25% of total world’s production of this food.

Kraft Mac & Cheese made of natural ingredients made in Canada and USA. it is packaged in Quebec with Canadian wheat and milk.

Why this cheap food is very successful especially in Canada and it is even called de facto national dish? Even former Canadian Prime Minister Paul Martin said that it is his favorite dish, Stephen Harper mentioned that he cooks it for his kids as well.

A good explanation gives Canadian novelist and artist Douglas Coupland:

Cheese plays a weirdly large dietary role in the lives of Canadians, who have a more intimate and intense relationship with Kraft food products than the citizens of any other country. This is not a shameless product plug — for some reason, Canadians and Kraft products have bonded the way Australians have bonded with Marmite, or the English with Heinz baked beans. In particular, Kraft Macaroni and Cheese, known simply as Kraft Dinner, is the biggie, probably because it so precisely laser-targets the favored Canadian food groups: fat, sugar, starch and salt.

Mac & Cheese is easy to cook, simple, affordable, delicious, it is sold all around the country and it is good with beer. What’s not to like?

p.s.

Kraft Dinner is a frequent staple of Canadian university student diets, particularly those in heavy debt.